Saturday, March 14, 2020

Robert Sengstacke Abbott Biography

Robert Sengstacke Abbott Biography Abbot was born in Georgia on November 24, 1870. His parents, Thomas and Flora Abbott were both former slaves. Abbott’s father died when he was young, and his mother remarried John Sengstacke, a German immigrant.   Abbott attended Hampton Institute in 1892 where he studied printing as a trade. While attending Hampton, Abbott toured with the Hampton Quartet, a group similar to the Fisk Jubilee Singers. He graduated in 1896 and two years later, he graduated from Kent College of Law in Chicago. Following law school, Abbott made several attempts to establish himself as an attorney in Chicago. Due to racial discrimination, he was unable to practice law. Newspaper Publisher: The Chicago Defender In 1905, Abbott founded The Chicago Defender. With an investment of twenty-five cents, Abbott published the first edition of  The Chicago Defender  by using his landlord’s kitchen to print copies of the paper. The first edition of the newspaper was an actual collection of news clippings from other publications as well as Abbotts reporting.   By 1916,  The Chicago Defender’s  circulation was 50,000 and it was considered one of the best African-American newspapers in the United States. Within two years, the circulation had reached 125,000 and by the early 1920s, it was well over 200,000.   From the outset, Abbott employed yellow journalistic tactics-sensational headlines and dramatic news accounts of African-American communities. The paper’s tone was militant. Writers  referred to African-Americans, not as black or negro but as the race. Graphic images of lynchings, assaults and other acts of violence against African-Americans were published prominently in the paper. These images were not present to scare its readers, but rather, to shed light on lynchings and other acts of violence that African-Americans endured throughout the United States.  Through its coverage of the  Red Summer of 1919, the publication used these race riots to campaign for anti-lynching legislation. As an African-American news publisher, Abbott’s mission was not only to print news stories, he had a nine-point mission that included: American race prejudice must be destroyedThe opening up of all trade-unions to blacks as well as whites.Representation in the Presidents CabinetEngineers, firemen, and conductors on all American railroads, and all jobs in government.Representation in all departments of the police forces over the entire United StatesGovernment schools open to all American citizens in preference to foreignersMotormen and conductors on surface, elevated and motor bus lines throughout AmericaFederal legislation to abolish lynching.Full enfranchisement of all American citizens. Abbott was a supporter of The Great Migration and wanted southern African-Americans to escape the economic disadvantages and social injustice that plagued the South. Writers such as Walter White and Langston Hughes served as columnists; Gwendolyn Brooks published one of her earliest poems in the pages of the publication. The Chicago Defender and the Great Migration   In an effort to push the Great Migration forward, Abbott held an event on May 15, 1917, called the Great Northern Drive. The Chicago Defender  published train schedules and job listings in its advertising pages as well as editorials, cartoons, and news articles to persuade African-Americans to relocate to northern cities. As a result of Abbott’s depictions of the North, The Chicago Defender became known as â€Å"the greatest stimulus that the migration had.†Ã‚   Once African-Americans had reached northern cities, Abbott used the pages of the publication not only to show horrors of the South, but also the pleasantries of the North.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

The History of Love Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

The History of Love - Essay Example The novel has two main characters who also act as narrators of their specific sections. The first narrator is Leo Gursky, an 80year old Polish immigrant in New York. We are first introduced to Leo Gursky when he believes his life is coming to an end, living alone in a small apartment in Manhattan â€Å"I often wonder who will be the last person to see me alive. If I had to bet, I’d bet on the delivery boy from the Chinese takeout. I order in four nights out of seven. Whenever he comes, I make a big production of finding my wallet. He stands in the door holding the greasy bag while I wonder if this is the night I’ll finish off my spring roll, climb into bed, and have a heart attack in my sleep†(Krauss 3). He is scared of dying on a day when nobody has noticed him and says and believes he has to persuade himself of his existence by making himself noticeable. This drives him to mildly attention-seeking behavior like creating a disturbance by dropping his change in a shop or trying on shoes that he does not intend to buy. Gursky passes for a man without much of a life, but we later learn that he was once a man very rich in art and love. He was once in love with a woman called Alma back in Poland, but due to the chaos and tragedy of war while making his way to America, he is separated from his true love Alma who ends up marrying somebody else. Leo’s art is manifested when we are told of a novel he wrote in Poland, The History of Love, but entrusted it to his friend Zvi Litvinoff who later told him that it was lost. The second character is Alma Singer a fourteen year old girl living with her widowed mother, Charlotte and her brother. We later learn that Alma was named after the heroine of a book her father, David singer loved and that Leo Gursky’s book was not lost after all but it was published in Spanish in Chile and that’s how it ended up in the hands of David singer Charlottes’ husband. Alma’s mother is tran slating a novel called The History of love she was given by her husband from Spanish to English. Krauss’s novel centers on the book that was written by Leo in Yiddish, in which all the girls are named after his love Alma. According to Gursky, just the same way Eve was the first woman in the bible is the same way Alma will be the first girl (Krauss 38). As Alma grows up, she is determined to find the real life Alma whom she was named after. Her detective work spurred after a mysterious stranger sends her mum a letter requesting her to translate the Spanish version of â€Å"the history of love† into English. She sets out to bring back her mother into loving again and decides that the mysterious stranger who commissioned the translation of the history of love into English might be a love interest for her mother and she does sets to find out who the stranger could be. As the novel progresses, we start to get passages from Gursky's novel laid out within the Krauss’s novel. Krauss is able to connect the two levels of fiction - the novel within and the novel without. Gursky’s tone is a disappointed, dry voice while Alma's tone is more engaged and naive with most of her expedition written as a comedy. In the young Alma's story we find a charming girl emerging into adulthood

Monday, February 10, 2020

The Revolutionary Afghan Women's Association Essay

The Revolutionary Afghan Women's Association - Essay Example Outsiders came to know or tried to know more about the tragedies of women life in Afghanistan only after they declared war against terror and entered Afghanistan for destroying Taliban. In fact the strict Islamic rules implemented by Taliban prevented the entry of westerners to the soil of Afghanistan and hence the external world failed to recognize the exact situations in Afghanistan under Taliban regime. Moreover Taliban has imposed strict control over freedom of expression and hence it was not easy for the foreign media to enter into the Afghan territory. â€Å"The crisis for afghan women did not begin with Taliban; it has been ongoing for a decade starting with the priod of Jehadi fundamentalist rule and civil war (1992-1996) While women were not subject to all of the legal prohibitions as they later were under Taliban rule, the armed factions rampant lawlessness and human rights violations including abductions, rapes, and forced marriages, specifically targeted women†.1 In order to escape from exploitation from all corners, some Muslim females under the leadership of Meena have started a movement called Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) in 1977. â€Å"RAWA, the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, was established in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 1977 as an independent political/social organization of Afghan women fighting for human rights and for social justice in Afghanistan. The founders were a number of Afghan woman intellectuals under the sagacious leadership of Meena who in 1987 was assassinated in Quetta, Pakistan, by Afghan agents of the then KGB in connivance with fundamentalist band of Gulbuddin Hekmatyar†. 2 Though RAWA when formed was aimed only at the reformation of the Muslim females in Afghanistan, later the objectives of RAWA has been integrated to other Muslim countries like Pakistan and Bangladesh as well where the females suffer torture from male dominated societies. â€Å"Male dominan ce

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Importance of English Essay Example for Free

Importance of English Essay Good morning, teacher and fellow students.Today I would like to talk to you about â€Å"the Importance of English.† First, English is the language for communication more than 1.5 billion people speaks this language everyday. It is indeed one of the most widely spoken languages in this world. Second, English is the language for Science and Technology many books are written in English. Many research papers are presented in English. If you are good in English, you were be able to give up with it latest development. Third, English is the language for travel if you ever travel oversea, you will understand it is importance .For example, you go to the airport-you read signs and directions in English .You checked into a hotel-you speak English with the receptionists .You go shopping-you bargain in English .You go to a restaurant-you order you food in English. Imagine just how difficult things can be if you can’t speak English well. Finale, English is the language for international business and trade. If you want to do business internationally, you were have to commence with your business associates in English, the better your English is the more business opportunities you were have. My conclusion is that everybody must learn this importance languages .You want be successful, MASTER ENGLISH! ! ! You want to have good career, MASTER ENGLISH! ! ! You want to make friend with people from all over the world, MASTER ENGLISH! ! ! If you successfully master English, You were have many more opportunities in life so make up you mind, pick up your book, open your mouth and start learning English today.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

WITCH :: essays research papers

In the winter of 1692, a wave of witch hysteria surrounded the settlement of Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The accusations began with two little girls who were acting strangely. There are many underlying factors to why these thoughts of witchcraft started coming about. These issues were going on before that winter of 1692. The winter of 1692 was the onset of the hysterics behind the witchcraft trials.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  To understand the reasons behind the hysteria, you have to know a little about the people who settled the area of Salem Village. Mainly Puritans inhabited Salem Village. There were very few other religions at that time. The Puritans left England to escape religious persecution. Puritans wanted to purify the national church by eliminated what they saw as Catholic influence. They believed in the total sovereignty of God and the absolute sinfulness of man. They wanted to establish a union of church and state. Puritans believed they were entering into a sacred compact with God in the founding of the Massachusetts colony. They agreed to live according to his will in return for a divine endorsement in the New World.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The people of Salem Village believed in witches. The word witchcraft meant the â€Å"art of bewitching, casting spells, or manipulating the forces of nature†. It was the idea of the people that this was impossible without the cooperation of the Devil. Many perceived that the Devil resented their way of life. The Devil had to act through a witch to do physical harm to human beings. He couldnt do it on his own. People who wholly believed in witches were always on the lookout for them. As a result, many people were wrongly accused.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Puritans viewed the world in basic black and white. Discipline and devotion were slogans in the service of the Lord. The simplest acts of innocence were looked upon as questionable conduct or even abnormal. Sinners were severely punished in Salem Village. The punishments were meant to humiliate the person as well as hurt.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  There was never respect for the privacy of any individual in the seventeenth century. The community as a whole was expected to uphold the Puritan religion. They were encouraged to watch their neighbors closely and report any behavior that drifted even slightly from the â€Å"straight and narrow†.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  According to some sources there was a problem with womens increasing independence. They lived in a society where men exercised substantial authority over a woman.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Family Assessment

Running head: HEALTH ASSESSMENT Family Focused Health Assessment Nancy E Gundersen Grand Canyon University NRS429v December 4, 2011 Family Focused Health Assessment This paper will assess a family interviewed using Gordon’s 11 functional health patterns. It will summarize the findings for each health pattern from a designated number of interview questions. The author identifies two wellness nursing diagnoses based on the author’s assessment of the family health patterns and the answers provided to the interview questions. The family interviewed was a husband and wife who live active lives. They have recently moved from Colorado to Texas and both have new jobs. They have 3 children and 2 grandchildren who reside in Oregon and Colorado. The wife recently went through radiation therapy for MALT lymphoma and the husband recently learned he has been living with only 1 kidney and a herniated disk. The husband has had gout since he was twenty five and the wife was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome at age eighteen. These conditions have been controlled by diet and medication. Otherwise this family is fairly healthy. They are from different backgrounds and different cultures but have adapted their own traditions and health habits. Both are mastered prepared and share similar hobbies and interests. Summary of functional health patterns; 1. Values, health perceptions a. Both family members value health and do not have cultural influences as it relates to how they obtain a healthy lifestyle. They understand that eating right and exercising will increase their chances of regaining their health. 2. Nutrition b. Both family members work fulltime and have a very full schedule. They arise early and are out the door with a minimal breakfast. The husband has a slim fast nutrition drink while the wife may have a bowl of cereal or slice of toast. Their lunch habits vary. The wife usually brings lunch with her that includes a sandwich or protein bar. The husband usually goes home for lunch and will make himself a cup of soup or a leftover salad. The wife usually does not arrive home until 6:30 or 7pm while the husband is home by 5pm. He is able to make healthy dinners as he enjoys cooking. They both try to stay away from t he foods that will bring on symptoms of gout or irritable bowel syndrome. 3. Sleep/Rest c. The husband does not usually have problems falling asleep but will get up during the night to use the bathroom. He only uses sleep aids when he travels as his sleep patterns are interrupted. The wife has a hard time falling asleep because of the stresses of the day and will occasionally use an over the counter sleep aid if she is unable to get a good night sleep for several days. 4. Elimination d. The husband has no issue with proper elimination. He attributes this to eating a lot of salads. The wife however, because of her irritable bowel syndrome will sometimes alternate between having constipation and diarrhea. She takes a probiotic routinely, benefiber and drinks plenty of water in addition to trying to watch what she eats to stay regular. . Activity/Exercise e. Both family members consider exercise as an important part of their daily life. Recent illnesses have prevented their ability to do strenuous exercise. The husband most recently hurt his back and the wife has not yet fully recovered from her radiation treatment. Both do other forms of activities however including taking stairs inst ead of elevators, walking nine holes of golf and routine household chores such as yard work. 6. Cognitive f. Both family members do much better when they are in control of a meeting or situation. They feel clear headed and better prepared. They both have periods when they may forget to do something they were asked and have learned to write things down to help prevent this from happening. 7. Sensory-perception g. Both family members are dealing with conditions that have not allowed them to be as active as they have been in the past. They frequently complain of joint pain or muscle aches. They try to stretch and work up to more strenuous activity. Gout causes joint pain and a recent diagnosis of a herniated disk has increased back pain for the husband who is going to physical therapy once a week. 8. Self-perception h. The wife was diagnosed with cancer. This was a very stressful situation and the husband felt helpless as he could not alleviate her symptoms. The wife was afraid and felt helpless and fearful. The husband has also come to the realization that he is not able to play golf like he use to as he has restrictive movement due to his back problems. They both feel discouraged at times and have feelings of despair. 9. Role Responsibility i. Both family members feel they communicate well with each other and have developed routines that fit their lifestyle. The wife does not like to cook but the husband does so that works out very well. The husband’s recent role of caregiver while the wife was going through radiation therapy was a situation they both had to deal with but in different ways. The wife stated she always thought she would be the one caring for her husband not the other way around. 10. Sexuality j. The recent stresses that both have gone through has affected their sexual patterns. Moving, a critical medical diagnosis, a new job, making new friends and leaving their children was very difficult for both. Each stated they just worked through it. 11. Coping k. They both have been through a lot this past year and ? and it is maintaining a level head, knowing that they can count on each other and using logic not emotion to deal with issues has gotten them through some difficult times. Wellness nursing diagnosis The wellness nursing diagnosis within this family that might be candidates for intervention would be in the areas of activity and exercise and sleep rest patterns. The recent diagnosis for both family members has affected their normal exercise routine. Their wellness nursing diagnosis would be the readiness for an enhanced exercise program. They need more exercise to increase their aerobic cardiac health and need to resurrect the exercise routine that they enjoyed prior to their illness. Their risk diagnosis is disuse syndrome and the husband is at risk for peripheral neurovascular dysfunction and impaired physical mobility. If this family does not follow a proper exercise program that best fits their health condition and lifestyle they can easily become sedentary and increase their chances for other health risks. The actual wellness nursing diagnosis for both family members is they currently have activity intolerance. The nursing wellness diagnosis for sleep-rest pattern is necessary for this family is they need to have a program established to enhance their sleep habits. They both have interrupted sleep patterns and use medication to help them rest. They both have disturbed sleep patterns and are at risk for sleep deprivation. The actual nursing wellness diagnosis would be sleep pattern disturbance and sleep deprivation. This family has done exceptionally well coping with the recent health issues they have had to face. They are a team and stated they need to regain their health. Continuing their healthy lifestyle, with all the obstacles, has only brought them closer together. They are working hard to get healthy again and building up their stamina when it comes to exercising is top of their list. They continue to do research on what may be beneficial for them and will do whatever it takes to accomplish their goals. References Edelman, M. Health promotion throughout lifespan 7th edition. Mosby Elsevier. Gundersen, N. E. (2011, December 4). Family health assessment. (Interview with Mr. and Mrs. John Howard) (Mr. and Mrs. John Howard, Trans. ) (Interviewed using Gordon's 11 functional health patterns as a guide). Austin Texas (Original work published 22 Questions developed using Gordon's 11 functional health patterns). Weber, J. R. (2005). Nursing diagnoses (Wellness, risk and actual) grouped according to functional health patterns. In Nurses handbook of health assessment 5th edition Philadelphia, Lippincott, Williams &Wilkens. Retrieved from http://jxzy. smu. edu. cn/jkpg/Uploadfiles/file/TF_06928152357_nursing%20grouped%20by%20functional%20health%20patterns. pdf Family Assessment Family Assessment a) Family form A definition of family: â€Å"A family is two or more persons who are joined together by bonds of sharing and emotional closeness and who identify themselves as being part of a family. † Friedman (1997) The Jordan’s are a nuclear family. The family members include husband, wife and three children. Dad is forty four years old, Mom is forty one years old and the three boys are seven, nine and eleven. The children are all in school, the parents help the seven year old who is in second grade with his homework. While I was visiting, the youngest child was working on a book report.He was asking several questions of his Mom during the interview. The boy was very well-mannered and said â€Å"excuse me† before asking for help. The nine and eleven year old boys are quite independent with all their school work. When they have a bible reading schedule related to their worship, they read together as a family. b) Patterns of Interaction/Communi cation The wife does all the domestic duties with the help of the oldest child. This family are Jehovah’s Witnessess and culturally, the husband is the bread winner of the house and should work hard to provide for the entire family. The wife should take care of all the house work.Jehovah’s Witnessess believe the wife should not work. The Mothers job is to make sure the entire family’s needs are met. This includes caring for her children emotionally, physically and psychologically. Like the Bowen’s Family Systems Theory, the family is seen as an emotional unit. I did observe Mrs. Jordan as a very compassionate, concerned and emotional mother. She was very serious when talking about her children; she felt strongly that the boys should be able to come to her with any issues, good or bad. Mrs. Jordan is also responsible for the family budget and finances. When asked â€Å"Who has the power and authority in our family? Mrs. Jordan replied, â€Å"The Bible, J ehovah’s Word has the power in our family. It is the essence and the foundation of our family. † If there is a decision to be made that affects the whole family, the husband and wife make the decisions, but the husband is the head of the household. The family believes in what the bible says, â€Å"The Golden Rule†, â€Å"Treat others the way you want to be treated. † The developmental theory considers overtime the family unit foes through various phases that can be predicted based on norms. The family development approach examines role expectations within the family unit.I asked the family, â€Å"Are there any role assessments, such as â€Å"the good child† or â€Å"neat freak† the boys laughed and look at each other. Then the mom quickly responded, â€Å"No. Not at all. Our children know the law contained in the Bible and are governed by its principles. † They all seemed to be comfortable when answering the questions in the interview , although their answers were somewhat vague, the dad did not participate much in the interview. Instead, he was answering calls and working from home. The family was asked if they engage in any activities together. The family volunteers in Life Saving Preaching Work.They are all involved in this ministry that saves lives. In other words, they share the gospel with others, believing that they with come to know the Lord. The husband is also a volunteer in the medical field. He was not specific when answering this question. The Jordan’s also have what they call â€Å"round table discussions† which they partake in every Friday night. c) Boundaries I wanted to know if their family had any subjects that were difficult to discuss together. The family brought up the subject of racism. Mrs. Jordan shared a story about other children in school making racial comments to her child.This was devastating to Mrs. Jordan and she found it very hard and complicated to discuss. She felt anger toward the children that bullied her son. We discussed other boundaries as well. For example, I asked if the family members interact with groups outside of their family, Mrs. Jordan said â€Å"We’re Jehovah’s Witnesses and as such, we are a part of an international brotherhood and we do not need invitation before visiting any of our brothers and sisters what we do not do is associate closely with non-witnesses, because bad association spoils useful habits. Everyone in the family seemed to agree with mom on this subject. In fact, the middle boy shared that they were only allowed to have a sleepover with other children born into Jehovah’s witnesses with manners based on the bible. He also mentioned that it is a rule in their house; they can only play their videos or watch TV on Friday, Saturday and Sunday until noon. d) Family Values & Norms The Structure Function Theory suggests the family is viewed as an organization; roles, values, and communication are integral components. The Jordan’s differ from many families I know because of their strong religious beliefs.The Jordan’s values are based on the bible and all of them are equally important, according to Mrs. Jordan. She also stated â€Å"Honesty, it’s a way of life. † It is also very important to the family that they are sharing the gift of everlasting life with others who decide to listen to their preaching work. The family likes to spend time with each other every day. During breakfast they read their daily devotionals, and the father says a prayer on behalf of the whole family before they depart for the day. e) Religion Religion is very important to the family, and they have strong religious beliefs that may affect their healthcare decisions.They are to put their spiritual well-being before any other things. As a Jehovah’s Witness, they do not accept blood transfusions under any circumstance, even in the face of death according to scriptures Le viticus 17:10, 11, Leviticus 17:13,14, Acts 15:22-29. When asked if the family attended church, Mrs. Jordan informed me that they do not attend church, but they do attend regular meeting at their Kingdom Hall. Mrs. Jordan said, â€Å"We are fifth generation Jehovah’s Witnesses therefore we are born and raised to do everything according to the bible.When asked if the family attended church, Mrs. Jordan informed me that they do not attend church, but they do attend regular meeting at their Kingdom Hall. Mrs. Jordan said, â€Å"We are fifth generation Jehovah’s Witnesses therefore we are born and raised to do everything according to the bible. f) Culture g) Family Stressors Lastly, I wanted to know if the family is currently dealing with any stressors. Currently Mrs. Jordan says that she is bored at home and would like to go back to work. h) Family’s Strength and Resources The children were very well behaved during this interview.The oldest son, took my coat, and asked if I would like anything to drink. I thought the three boys were all extremely well mannered, gentlemen. The Father did not participate much in the interview; he was also very polite and welcoming. The Jordan family has much strength such as, communication, honesty, love and discipline. Like Mrs. Jordan I feel that discipline is a form of love. The family I connected, they sound time with one another and they help each other out. In addition, the family has many resources in their community of Jehovah’s Witnesses.From what I understand this is a very connected community. They are likely to find the help of others in their community if they needed. Summary I think the family and I both learned a few things from this interview. I particularly found it intriguing that the family reads the bible together every day. If and when I have children of my own, I will have this tradition with my family as well. I found out more interesting information when I asked questions regard ing the family’s health care. The family uses primary prevention measures such as; a healthy diet and exercise.The entire family has a membership at a fitness gym. The family is however against immunizations because they believe it can cause other health issues. The husband is a doctor and says he â€Å"has knowledge† of the serious side effects. I can understand the concern as parents, but as their nurse it is my job to explain both the risks and benefits. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) strongly recommends that the risks and benefits are discussed by a nurse or doctor before any refusal documents are signed. That means that we are to teach on each vaccine and the disease it prevents.I would also refer them to the AAP website that has information on immunizations, providing parents an opportunity to ask questions about their concerns and attempting to understand parents’ reason for refusing one or more vaccines. It is important to maintain a supportive relationship with the family. The AAP encourages documentation the health care provider’s discussion with the parents of the serious risks. Have the parent sign the refusal for and keep it the patient’s medical record. The secondary prevention measures were regular checkups which are performed by the mom and dad.The dad is a neurosurgeon, and the mom has a nursing degree. The husband is the wife’s primary physician also. She also admitted that she has never had a dental checkup, but the children have. She never had a mammogram and doesn’t intend to until she is sixty five years old. And lastly, when asked about medication taken, Mrs. Jordan explained, no one is on any medications. The goals I develop must be realistic, asking myself, â€Å"to what extent can the goals be achieved? † I personally feel like the parents are adamant regarding the children’s immunizations.I would however provide them with the information from the AAP website to increase the knowledge or provide them with information that they may have previously misinterpreted or misunderstood. I would set a goal with Mrs. Jordan that she gets her annual mammogram and dental check-ups every six months as recommended by the American Dental Association (ADA). The National Cancer Society (NCI) recommends that women age forty or older have screening mammograms every one to two years, and the standard recommendation is to visit a dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Family Assessment Family Assessment a) Family form A definition of family: â€Å"A family is two or more persons who are joined together by bonds of sharing and emotional closeness and who identify themselves as being part of a family. † Friedman (1997) The Jordan’s are a nuclear family. The family members include husband, wife and three children. Dad is forty four years old, Mom is forty one years old and the three boys are seven, nine and eleven. The children are all in school, the parents help the seven year old who is in second grade with his homework. While I was visiting, the youngest child was working on a book report.He was asking several questions of his Mom during the interview. The boy was very well-mannered and said â€Å"excuse me† before asking for help. The nine and eleven year old boys are quite independent with all their school work. When they have a bible reading schedule related to their worship, they read together as a family. b) Patterns of Interaction/Communi cation The wife does all the domestic duties with the help of the oldest child. This family are Jehovah’s Witnessess and culturally, the husband is the bread winner of the house and should work hard to provide for the entire family. The wife should take care of all the house work.Jehovah’s Witnessess believe the wife should not work. The Mothers job is to make sure the entire family’s needs are met. This includes caring for her children emotionally, physically and psychologically. Like the Bowen’s Family Systems Theory, the family is seen as an emotional unit. I did observe Mrs. Jordan as a very compassionate, concerned and emotional mother. She was very serious when talking about her children; she felt strongly that the boys should be able to come to her with any issues, good or bad. Mrs. Jordan is also responsible for the family budget and finances. When asked â€Å"Who has the power and authority in our family? Mrs. Jordan replied, â€Å"The Bible, J ehovah’s Word has the power in our family. It is the essence and the foundation of our family. † If there is a decision to be made that affects the whole family, the husband and wife make the decisions, but the husband is the head of the household. The family believes in what the bible says, â€Å"The Golden Rule†, â€Å"Treat others the way you want to be treated. † The developmental theory considers overtime the family unit foes through various phases that can be predicted based on norms. The family development approach examines role expectations within the family unit.I asked the family, â€Å"Are there any role assessments, such as â€Å"the good child† or â€Å"neat freak† the boys laughed and look at each other. Then the mom quickly responded, â€Å"No. Not at all. Our children know the law contained in the Bible and are governed by its principles. † They all seemed to be comfortable when answering the questions in the interview , although their answers were somewhat vague, the dad did not participate much in the interview. Instead, he was answering calls and working from home. The family was asked if they engage in any activities together. The family volunteers in Life Saving Preaching Work.They are all involved in this ministry that saves lives. In other words, they share the gospel with others, believing that they with come to know the Lord. The husband is also a volunteer in the medical field. He was not specific when answering this question. The Jordan’s also have what they call â€Å"round table discussions† which they partake in every Friday night. c) Boundaries I wanted to know if their family had any subjects that were difficult to discuss together. The family brought up the subject of racism. Mrs. Jordan shared a story about other children in school making racial comments to her child.This was devastating to Mrs. Jordan and she found it very hard and complicated to discuss. She felt anger toward the children that bullied her son. We discussed other boundaries as well. For example, I asked if the family members interact with groups outside of their family, Mrs. Jordan said â€Å"We’re Jehovah’s Witnesses and as such, we are a part of an international brotherhood and we do not need invitation before visiting any of our brothers and sisters what we do not do is associate closely with non-witnesses, because bad association spoils useful habits. Everyone in the family seemed to agree with mom on this subject. In fact, the middle boy shared that they were only allowed to have a sleepover with other children born into Jehovah’s witnesses with manners based on the bible. He also mentioned that it is a rule in their house; they can only play their videos or watch TV on Friday, Saturday and Sunday until noon. d) Family Values & Norms The Structure Function Theory suggests the family is viewed as an organization; roles, values, and communication are integral components. The Jordan’s differ from many families I know because of their strong religious beliefs.The Jordan’s values are based on the bible and all of them are equally important, according to Mrs. Jordan. She also stated â€Å"Honesty, it’s a way of life. † It is also very important to the family that they are sharing the gift of everlasting life with others who decide to listen to their preaching work. The family likes to spend time with each other every day. During breakfast they read their daily devotionals, and the father says a prayer on behalf of the whole family before they depart for the day. e) Religion Religion is very important to the family, and they have strong religious beliefs that may affect their healthcare decisions.They are to put their spiritual well-being before any other things. As a Jehovah’s Witness, they do not accept blood transfusions under any circumstance, even in the face of death according to scriptures Le viticus 17:10, 11, Leviticus 17:13,14, Acts 15:22-29. When asked if the family attended church, Mrs. Jordan informed me that they do not attend church, but they do attend regular meeting at their Kingdom Hall. Mrs. Jordan said, â€Å"We are fifth generation Jehovah’s Witnesses therefore we are born and raised to do everything according to the bible.When asked if the family attended church, Mrs. Jordan informed me that they do not attend church, but they do attend regular meeting at their Kingdom Hall. Mrs. Jordan said, â€Å"We are fifth generation Jehovah’s Witnesses therefore we are born and raised to do everything according to the bible. f) Culture g) Family Stressors Lastly, I wanted to know if the family is currently dealing with any stressors. Currently Mrs. Jordan says that she is bored at home and would like to go back to work. h) Family’s Strength and Resources The children were very well behaved during this interview.The oldest son, took my coat, and asked if I would like anything to drink. I thought the three boys were all extremely well mannered, gentlemen. The Father did not participate much in the interview; he was also very polite and welcoming. The Jordan family has much strength such as, communication, honesty, love and discipline. Like Mrs. Jordan I feel that discipline is a form of love. The family I connected, they sound time with one another and they help each other out. In addition, the family has many resources in their community of Jehovah’s Witnesses.From what I understand this is a very connected community. They are likely to find the help of others in their community if they needed. Summary I think the family and I both learned a few things from this interview. I particularly found it intriguing that the family reads the bible together every day. If and when I have children of my own, I will have this tradition with my family as well. I found out more interesting information when I asked questions regard ing the family’s health care. The family uses primary prevention measures such as; a healthy diet and exercise.The entire family has a membership at a fitness gym. The family is however against immunizations because they believe it can cause other health issues. The husband is a doctor and says he â€Å"has knowledge† of the serious side effects. I can understand the concern as parents, but as their nurse it is my job to explain both the risks and benefits. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) strongly recommends that the risks and benefits are discussed by a nurse or doctor before any refusal documents are signed. That means that we are to teach on each vaccine and the disease it prevents.I would also refer them to the AAP website that has information on immunizations, providing parents an opportunity to ask questions about their concerns and attempting to understand parents’ reason for refusing one or more vaccines. It is important to maintain a supportive relationship with the family. The AAP encourages documentation the health care provider’s discussion with the parents of the serious risks. Have the parent sign the refusal for and keep it the patient’s medical record. The secondary prevention measures were regular checkups which are performed by the mom and dad.The dad is a neurosurgeon, and the mom has a nursing degree. The husband is the wife’s primary physician also. She also admitted that she has never had a dental checkup, but the children have. She never had a mammogram and doesn’t intend to until she is sixty five years old. And lastly, when asked about medication taken, Mrs. Jordan explained, no one is on any medications. The goals I develop must be realistic, asking myself, â€Å"to what extent can the goals be achieved? † I personally feel like the parents are adamant regarding the children’s immunizations.I would however provide them with the information from the AAP website to increase the knowledge or provide them with information that they may have previously misinterpreted or misunderstood. I would set a goal with Mrs. Jordan that she gets her annual mammogram and dental check-ups every six months as recommended by the American Dental Association (ADA). The National Cancer Society (NCI) recommends that women age forty or older have screening mammograms every one to two years, and the standard recommendation is to visit a dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings.

Monday, January 6, 2020

Cómo cambiar caso en Corte migratoria para otro estado

Los migrantes con una cita para presentarte en una Corte de Inmigracià ³n ubicada en un lugar alejado al de su residencia habitual pueden solicitar un cambio de Corte. Es lo que se conoce en inglà ©s como change of venue.  ¿Quà © puede pasar si un migrante no se presenta a su cita en una corte migratoria? Los migrantes que han recibido citacià ³n para presentarse en una fecha y hora determinada en una Corte de Inmigracià ³n durante su proceso de deportacià ³n deben cumplir con esta obligacià ³n. En caso de no hacerlo, lo mà ¡s probable es que se dicte una orden de deportacià ³n in absentia. En estos casos, si el migrante es posteriormente detenido serà ¡ deportado inmediatamente sin tener derecho a presentarse ante un juez. Ademà ¡s, una vez deportado tendrà ¡ un castigo adicional que le impide solicitar por un plazo de cinco aà ±os los perdones I-601 y/o I-212. 6 pasos para cambiar Corte migratoria a otra mà ¡s cercana al lugar de residencia Cuando un migrante desea cambiar la corte de inmigracià ³n para otra mà ¡s conveniente teniendo en cuenta su lugar de domicilio actual debe seguir los siguientes pasos: Cambio de corte, conocido en inglà ©s como Change of Venue Debe escribirse en inglà ©s una pà ¡gina de introduccià ³n a la que se debe titular Respondent ´s Motion to Change Venue, es decir, tu peticià ³n para cambiar la Corte. En esa pà ¡gina el migrante debe anotar su nombre completo,  el alien registration number, el estatus migratorio, el nombre y el tipo de procedimiento, el nombre del juez asignado a tu caso, el dà ­a y la hora de la cita en la Corte. Esta informacià ³n se encuentra en el documento llamado Notice to Appear (I-862), que es la carta en la que se cita al migrante para que se presente en corte. Ademà ¡s, el migrante debe admitir o negar los cargos que se presentan en su contra en dicha Notice to Appear y la lista de alivios que se piensan solicitar como, por ejemplo, el asilo, la cancelacià ³n de la deportacià ³n, la salida voluntaria, etc. Asimismo, debe incluirse la nueva direccià ³n y nà ºmero de telà ©fono y argumentar por quà © se solicita el cambio de corte, incluyendo documentos y evidencia que prueben que, efectivamente, el migrante tiene su domicilio en un lugar alejado al de la corte inicialmente designada. Cambio de direccià ³n notificando el nuevo domicilio Se debe completar el formulario (forma) EOIR 33, donde se notifica a la Corte el cambio de direccià ³n. Es el papel azul en la documentacià ³n que se le ha entregado al migrante. En la actualidad existe un procedimiento diferente al que se ha mencionado (carta de change of venue y formulario EOIR 33, que es de color azul- y que solo aplica a los menores cuya corte està ¡ fijada en Harlingen, Texas. En ese caso, deben completarse las planillas azul y pà ºrpura que se encuentran en el paquete que se le entrega a cada menor. Copias de los formularios Hacer dos copias de la carta de change of venue y de la planilla de cambio de direccià ³n (la que es de color azul). Envà ­o a la corte de inmigracià ³n Enviar por correo certificado al juez de la corte de inmigracià ³n para la que se recibià ³ la citacià ³n la carta original y el formulario azul original junto en un mismo paquete. Todos esos papeles tienen que ser recibidos por la corte al menos 15 dà ­as antes de la fecha de la citacià ³n. Pero es muy recomendable enviarlos cuanto antes sea posible. La razà ³n es que la Corte puede solicitar mà ¡s evidencias, y se tendrà ­an que enviar dentro de plazo. Notificacià ³n al abogado del gobierno Enviar por correo certificado una copia de la carta de change of venue y de la planilla de cambio de direccià ³n a la oficina del abogado que representa a los intereses del gobierno en el caso. La otra copia que se hizo de los documentos debe guardarla el migrante, asà ­ como el resguardo de haber enviado dicha documentacià ³n por correo certificado. Verificacià ³n de que la corte recibià ³ los papeles Es obligacià ³n del migrante presentarse en corte el dà ­a y a la hora de su citacià ³n. Por lo tanto, debe llamar por telà ©fono a la Corte en la que originalmente se le cità ³ para verificar que recibieron la solicitud de cambio de corte.  ¿Quà © sucede despuà ©s de solicitar cambio de Corte? Pueden suceder dos cosas. En primer lugar, que la Corte acepte la peticià ³n, y asà ­ lo notificarà ¡ por escrito. En este caso te tienes que presentar a la nueva corte en el dà ­a y a la hora que te citen. En segundo lugar, puede suceder que la Corte niegue la peticià ³n. En este caso, el migrante tiene la obligacià ³n de presentarse el dà ­a de la cita en la corte original, ya que no hay cambio. Tips y recursos à ºtiles Los migrantes que se sienten cà ³modos en inglà ©s puedes escribir por sà ­ mismos la peticià ³n para cambiar la corte. Se puede encontrar inspiracià ³n en  el Immigration Court Practice Manual. Pero ya que presentarse en corte y luchar contra una deportacià ³n es un tema muy grave, todos los migrantes deben considerar contratar a un abogado de Inmigracià ³n para que realice este trà ¡mite y su defensa en corte. Si es un gasto caro que no se puede permitir, es aconsejable consultar con una organizacià ³n sin fin de lucro tipo Catholic Charities u otra. Finalmente, siempre es posible consultar informacià ³n bà ¡sica sobre fechas y plazos en el caso de tener un asunto pendiente en corte migratoria. Para ello marcar al 1-800-898-7180. Tener a mano el nà ºmero del Alien Registration Number. Cambio de corte migratoria Todos los migrantes que reciben una notificacià ³n para presentarse en una corte de inmigracià ³n està ¡n obligados a hacerlo en el lugar, dà ­a y hora indiciados. Esta obligacià ³n aplica a adultos y a nià ±os. De no cumplirla, la corte dicta una orden de deportacià ³n in absentia, es decir, sin que el migrante està © presente.Los migrantes pueden solicitar un cambio de corte cuando tienen su domicilio en un lugar alejado de la ciudad en la que està ¡ ubicada la corte. Por ejemplo, cuando se les detuvo en un estado y residen en otro.Si despuà ©s de enviar la solicitud pidiendo el cambio de corte y notificando la nueva direccià ³n el migrante no recibe confirmacià ³n de que la corte ha aprobado el cambio de ubicacià ³n, deberà ¡ presentarse a la cita en el dà ­a, hora y lugar inicialmente previsto. Este es un artà ­culo informativo. No es asesorà ­a legal.